Kane Springs Valley 12 - Habitat Site

  • kanesprings12b-004  General overviews of the habitat area including several rock rings.  Site 1- This site was a large seasonal habitat site and as recently as 10 years ago still had many artifacts lying about, but now most of the artifacts are gone.  It is still a beautiful location and contains a few rock rings and what may be several grinding slicks, a metate, and possible rock alignments.  It is easy to see why people would stay at this site during certain times of the year.  It has water, game, and shelter -- everything that would be needed for a comfortable place to camp or live.
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  • kanesprings12c-015  Possible rock alignments and grinding slicks.
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  • kanesprings12d-004  Metates
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  • kanesprings12e-019  Site 2 - Shelter site.
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  • kanesprings12a-009  Below is a Skunkbush Sumac, and the third photo is a Skunkbush with a nasty skin problem.  The young branches of the Skunkbush Sumac were, and still are, highly prized by the Southern Paiute basketmakers.  They were used for cradleboards, winnowing trays, and other types of baskets.  The Southern Paiute people in Utah still use it today to make wedding baskets which are sold to collectors and Navajo medicine men.  The red fruits were eaten fresh, dried, or ground and drunk as a beverage.
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